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Proton NMR Determination of Miscibility in a Bulk Model Photoresist System Poly (4-Hydroxystyene) and the Photoacid Generator, Di(t-butylphenyl) Iodonium Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

Published

Author(s)

David L. VanderHart, Vivek M. Prabhu, Eric K. Lin

Abstract

The intimacy of component mixing in 2 blends of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) and a photoacid generator (PAG), di(t-butylphenyl) iodonium perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were studied by solid state proton NMR. Mass ratios were 91/9 and 85/15 PHS/PFOS. These are simplified model blends for certain photoresist formulations used in the electronics industry. Multiple-pulse NMR techniques are used in both spin-diffusion and longitudinal relaxation experiments at ambient temperatures. It is deduced that PFOS is mixed with PHS on a molecular scale for PFOS mass fractions at or below 0.15; hence, the 2 components are thermodynamically miscible in this range. An attempt was also made to support the notion of intimate PFOS/PHS mixing by looking for evidence of 1H-19F dipolar broadening in multiple-pulse blend spectra. This attempt was not successful owing to rapid polarization-exchange between 19F nuclei.
Citation
Chemistry of Materials
Volume
16
Issue
16

Keywords

iodonium sulfonate, miscibility, NMR, photoresist, poly(hydroxystyrene) photoacid generator, proton spin diffusion

Citation

VanderHart, D. , Prabhu, V. and Lin, E. (2004), Proton NMR Determination of Miscibility in a Bulk Model Photoresist System Poly (4-Hydroxystyene) and the Photoacid Generator, Di(t-butylphenyl) Iodonium Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Chemistry of Materials, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=852101 (Accessed July 27, 2021)
Created July 13, 2004, Updated February 19, 2017