Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Present and Future Trends for Neutron Source Calibrations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

Author(s)

J M. Adams

Abstract

The Neutron Source Calibration Facility operated by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a world-class calibration laboratory providing neutron source calibration services for radioisotopic sources with neutron emission rates ranging from 5E5 s-1 to lElO s-1. Calibrations are performed using the manganous sulfate bath techniquewith a relative expanded uncertainty of approximately 3.5 % (2 sigma). Recently, an improvement to the calibration procedure has been implemented whereby sources are regularly cross-calibrated against the national standard neutron source as well as one of three (international) standard sources formerly maintained by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. Thisfeature helps ensure that the fidelity of NIST neutron source calibrations is maintained at the highest level. In addition to the Institute's external customers, NIST's Neutron Source Calibration Facility also provides important contributions to other neutron irradiation and calibration services provided by the Institute, as well as to NIST's intramural research programs inneutron metrology, nuclear reactor pressure-vessel dosimetry, and fundamental neutron physics.
Citation
Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research
Volume
213
Issue
1-806

Keywords

neutron source calibration, neutron source emission rate, NIST

Citation

Adams, J. (1970), Present and Future Trends for Neutron Source Calibrations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research (Accessed July 26, 2021)
Created August 26, 2016, Updated February 17, 2017