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Polymorphism and Structural Distortions of Ternary Mixed-Metal Oxide Photocatalysts Constructed with α-U3O8 Types of Layers

Published

Author(s)

Nacole B. King, Jonathan Boltersdorf, Paul Maggard, Winnie K. Wong-Ng

Abstract

A series of mixed-metal oxide structures based on the stacking of α-U3O8 type pentagonal bipyramid layers have been investigated for symmetry lowering distortions and photocatalytic activity. The family of structures contain the general composition Am+((n+1)/m)B(3n+1)O(8n+3) (e.g. A = Na, Ag, Pb, Bi; B = Nb, Ta), and the edge-shared BO7 pentagonal pyramid single and/or double layers are differentiated by the average thickness, n (1≤ n ≤2), of the BO7 layers and the local coordination environment of the “A” site cations. Temperature dependent polymorphism has been investigated for structures containing single layered (n=1) monovalent (m=1) “A” site cations (e.g. Ag2Nb4O11, Na2Nb4O11, and Cu2Ta4O11). Furthermore, symmetry lowering distortions were observed for the Pb ion-exchange synthesis of Ag2Ta4O11 to yield PbTa4O11. Several members within the subset of the family are constructed with optical and electronic properties that are suitable for the conversion of solar energy to chemical fuel via water splitting.
Citation
Crystals
Volume
7

Keywords

photocatalysis, mixed-metal oxide, structural distortion

Citation

King, N. , Boltersdorf, J. , Maggard, P. and Wong-Ng, W. (2017), Polymorphism and Structural Distortions of Ternary Mixed-Metal Oxide Photocatalysts Constructed with α-U3O8 Types of Layers, Crystals, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=923230 (Accessed April 23, 2024)
Created August 18, 2017, Updated March 26, 2019