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Photometry The CIE V(l) Function and What Can Be Learned from Photometry

Published

Author(s)

Yoshihiro Ohno, E A. Thompson

Abstract

The V(l) function, used in photometry, is an average action spectrum for the visual response of the human eye, and the matching of the spectral responsivity of photometers to V(l) is the most important criterion of photometers. Techniques have been developed to characterize photometers for spectral mismatch to the V(l) function and to correct for the mismatch errors as recommended in CIE Publication 69. These measurement techniques can be applied to broad-band UV radiometers and biological action spectra. As an example, two commercial UV radiometers have been analyzed for spectral mismatch errors using the spectral data of the Erythema function (McKinlay and Diffey CIE 1987) and the UV hazard function (ANSI RP27.1) for measurement of solar spectrum and an FEL halogen lamp. The results of the analysis show dramatic variations of measured values. Suggestions are made on the calibration of such UV radiometers to improve the accuracy of measurements for these UV action spectra.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the International Symposium on Measurements of Optical Radiation Hazards
Conference Dates
September 1, 1998
Conference Title
International Symposium on Measurements of Optical Radiation Hazards

Keywords

calibration, characterization, measurement, photometry, radiation hazard, radiometry, ultraviolet, UV radiometer

Citation

Ohno, Y. and Thompson, E. (1999), Photometry The CIE V(l) Function and What Can Be Learned from Photometry, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Measurements of Optical Radiation Hazards (Accessed February 29, 2024)
Created September 1, 1999, Updated February 17, 2017