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Performance of a Residential Heat Pump Operating in the Cooling Mode With Single Faults Imposed

Published

Author(s)

William V. Payne, Piotr A. Domanski, Minsung Kim, Christian Hermes

Abstract

System behavior of a R410A residential unitary split heat pump system operating in the cooling mode was investigated. Seven artificial faults were implemented: compressor/reversing valve leakage, improper outdoor air flow, improper indoor air flow, liquid line restriction, refrigerant undercharge, refrigerant overcharge, and presence of non-condensable gas in the refrigerant. Since the cooling mode expansion device was a thermostatic expansion valve (TXV), the system could adapt itself to considerable external variation. Thus, faulty behavior was not as detectable as it would have been in a system equipped with a fixed area expansion device. The distinctiveness of a fault depended on the TXV status. Heat exchanger faults effects upon performance depend on the sizing of the heat exchanger. Using the fault test database, a rule-based chart was proposed to detect and diagnose the fault. The effect of the various fault levels on EER was also estimated.
Citation
International Journal of Heating, Ventilating, Air-conditioning and Refrigerating Research
Volume
29

Keywords

fault diagnosis, heat pump fault detection, rule based decision chart, thermostatic expansion valve

Citation

Payne, W. , Domanski, P. , Kim, M. and Hermes, C. (2006), Performance of a Residential Heat Pump Operating in the Cooling Mode With Single Faults Imposed, International Journal of Heating, Ventilating, Air-conditioning and Refrigerating Research, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=861036 (Accessed March 3, 2024)
Created August 31, 2006, Updated October 12, 2021