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Ozone-Depleting Substances (ODSs) and Related Chemicals, Chapter 1 in Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2010, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project-Report No.52, 516 pp., World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2011.

Published

Author(s)

Stephen A. Montzka, S. Reimannander, Andreas Engel, Kirstin Kruger, O?Doherty Simon, William T. Sturges , Donald R. Blake , Marcel Dorf Dorf, Paul J. Fraser , Lucien Froidevaux , Kenneth Jucks, Karin Kreher, Michael J. Kurylo III, Abdelwahid Mellouki , John Miller , Ole J. Nielsen , Vladimir L. Orkin, Ronald G. Prinn , Robert Rhew , Michelle L. Santee , Andreas Stohl , Daniel P. Verdonik

Abstract

The present document will be part of the information upon which the Parties to the United Nations Montreal Protocol will base their future decisions regarding protection of the stratospheric ozone layer. OVERVIEW It has been recognized since the 1970s that a number of compounds emitted by human activities deplete stratospheric ozone. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was adopted in 1987 to protect global ozone and, consequently, protect life from increased ultraviolet (UV) radiation at Earth's surface. Chlorine- and bromine containing substances that are controlled by the Montreal Protocol are known as ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). ODSs are responsible for the depletion of stratospheric ozone observed in polar regions (for example, the "ozone hole" above Antarctica) and in middle latitudes. The severe depletion of stratospheric ozone observed in the Antarctic has increased UV at the surface and affected climate at southern high latitudes. The Montreal Protocol and its Amendments and Adjustments have successfully controlled the global production and consumption of ODSs over the last two decades, and the atmospheric abundances of nearly all major ODSs that wereinitially controlled are declining. Nevertheless, ozone depletion will continue for many more decades because several key ODSs last a long time in the atmosphere after emissions end. In contrast to the diminishing role of ODSs, changes in climate are expected to have an increasing influence on stratospheric ozone abundances in the coming decades. These changes derive principally from the emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide (CO2), associated with human activities. An important remaining scientific challenge is to project future ozone abundances based on an understanding of the complex linkages between ozone and climate change. Most ODSs are potent greenhouse gases. The buildup of ODS abundances over the last decades contributes to global warming. Th
Citation
Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2010, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project-Report No.52
Publisher Info
World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, -1

Citation

Montzka, S. , Reimannander, S. , Engel, A. , Kruger, K. , Simon, O. , Sturges, W. , Blake, D. , Dorf, M. , Fraser, P. , Froidevaux, L. , Jucks, K. , Kreher, K. , Kurylo III, M. , Mellouki, A. , Miller, J. , Nielsen, O. , Orkin, V. , Prinn, R. , Rhew, R. , Santee, M. , Stohl, A. and Verdonik, D. (2011), Ozone-Depleting Substances (ODSs) and Related Chemicals, Chapter 1 in Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2010, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project-Report No.52, 516 pp., World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2011., Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2010, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project-Report No.52, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, -1, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=909747 (Accessed February 20, 2024)
Created March 29, 2011, Updated October 12, 2021