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Optical Flatness Metrology for 300 mm Silicon Wafers

Published

Author(s)

Ulf Griesmann, Quandou (. Wang, T D. Raymond

Abstract

At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), we are developing two interferometric methods for measuring the thickness variation and flatness of free-standing and chucked silicon wafers with diameters up to 300mm. The eXtremely accurate CALIBration InterferometeR (XCALIBIR) is a precision phase measuring interferometer with an operating vacelength of 633nm and a test beam of 300 mm diameter. XCALIBIR is used to evaluate the flatness of chucked wafers. NIST''s infrared interferometer (IR2) is a phase measuring interferometer that operates at 1.55um and is used to measure the thickness variation of free-standing 300 mm silicon wafers.
Proceedings Title
American Institute of Physics Proceedings of the 2005 Conference on Characterization and Metrology for ULSI Technology
Volume
788
Conference Dates
March 15-28, 2005
Conference Location
Dallas, TX
Conference Title
American Institute of Physics Conference on Characterization and Metrology for ULSI Technology

Keywords

300mm silicon wafers, wafer flatness, wafer thickness variation (TTV and GBIR)

Citation

Griesmann, U. , Wang, Q. and Raymond, T. (2005), Optical Flatness Metrology for 300 mm Silicon Wafers, American Institute of Physics Proceedings of the 2005 Conference on Characterization and Metrology for ULSI Technology, Dallas, TX, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=822272 (Accessed July 13, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created April 1, 2005, Updated February 19, 2017