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Nondestructive Techniques to Investigate Corrosion Status in Concrete Structures

Published

Author(s)

Nicholas J. Carino

Abstract

A critical step in selecting the most appropriate repair strategy for a distressed concrete structure is to determine the corrosion status of reinforcing bars. Because of the complexity of the corrosion process, it is prudent to involve personnel who are experienced in the corrosion of steel in concrete. The corrosion engineer may employ a variety of tools to help make an assessment of the corrosion conditions. This paper provides an overview of the corrosion of steel in concrete and introduces some nondestructive electrochemical tools that are commonly used in corrosion investigations. The objective is to provide the repair specialist with basic information to allow effective communication with the corrosion engineer. Electrochemical principles involved in the corrosion of steel in concrete are reviewed. Subsequently, the half-cell potential method, the concrete Resistivity test, and the linear polarization method are discussed. The principles of operation and the inherent limitations of these methods are emphasized.
Volume
13
Issue
No. 3
Conference Dates
March 21-22, 1998
Conference Title
Workshop on Corrosion Protection in Concrete Repair

Keywords

building technology, concrete, corrosion, electrolytic cell, half-cell potential, nondestructive testing, polarization resistance, resistivity

Citation

Carino, N. (1999), Nondestructive Techniques to Investigate Corrosion Status in Concrete Structures, Workshop on Corrosion Protection in Concrete Repair (Accessed May 23, 2024)

Issues

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Created August 1, 1999, Updated February 19, 2017