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On Multiple Interpretations

Published

Author(s)

Jung-Hyun Han

Abstract

Literature of feature recognition, there has been a wall between feature recognition and process planning, Manufacturing knowledge which is typically used in process planning is rarely incorporated into feature recognition, and there is little communication between them. This paper proposes to integrate feature recognition and process planning, and presents an effort toward it with the problem of multiple interpretations. A set of features required to create a part is called a feature model or an interpretation of the oars. A part can have multiple interpretations. This paper formally classified existing approached for multiple interpretation into two schools, analyzes the complexities of their algorithms and reveals that the nature of multiple interpretations in combinatorial. Therefore, algorithms that try to generate all interpretation or an optimal interpretation are subject to combinatorial explolsion. As a solution, this paper presents a feature recognizer which computes a satisficing interpretation. However, a process planner may want alternative interpretations. Then, the feature recognizer has to be able to generate them. This paper proposes alternative interpretation on demand and presents its implementation.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of ACM Solid Modeling Symposium
Conference Dates
May 14-16, 1997
Conference Location
Atlanta, GA

Keywords

feature model, feature recognition, process planning, solid modeling

Citation

Han, J. (1997), On Multiple Interpretations, Proceedings of ACM Solid Modeling Symposium, Atlanta, GA (Accessed April 24, 2024)
Created May 1, 1997, Updated February 17, 2017