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Multi-pulse fitting of transition edge sensor signals from a near-infrared continuous-wave source

Published

Author(s)

Thomas Gerrits, Adriana E. Lita, Sae Woo Nam, Jianwei Lee, Lijiong Shen, Alessandro Cere, Christian Kurtsiefer

Abstract

Transition-edge sensors (TESs) are photon-number resolving calorimetric spectrometers with near unit efficiency. Their recovery time, which is on the order of microseconds, limits the number resolving ability and timing accuracy in high photon-flux conditions. This is usually addressed by pulsing the light source or discarding overlapping signals, thereby limiting its applicability. We present an approach to assign detection times to overlapping detection events in the regime of low signal-to-noise ratio, as in the case of TES detection of near-infrared radiation. We use a two-level discriminator, inherently robust against noise, to coarsely locate pulses in time and timestamp individual photoevents by fitting to a heuristic model. As an example, we measure the second-order time correlation of a coherent source in a single spatial mode using a single TES detector.
Citation
Review of Scientific Instruments
Volume
89

Keywords

single photon detector, transition edge sensor, quantum information

Citation

Gerrits, T. , Lita, A. , Nam, S. , Lee, J. , Shen, L. , Cere, A. and Kurtsiefer, C. (2018), Multi-pulse fitting of transition edge sensor signals from a near-infrared continuous-wave source, Review of Scientific Instruments, [online], https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5053834 (Accessed May 18, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 11, 2018, Updated July 9, 2019