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Multi-Detector Hydrodynamic Chromatography of Colloids: Following in Hamish Small's Footsteps

Published

Author(s)

Andre Striegel

Abstract

Hamish Small, scientist extraordinaire, is best known as the inventor of both ion chromatography and hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC). The latter has experienced a renaissance during the last decade- plus, thanks principally to its coupling to a multiplicity of physicochemical detection methods and to the structural and compositional information this provides. Detection methods such as light scattering (both multi-angle static and dynamic), viscometry, and refractometry can combine to yield insight into macromolecular or colloidal size, structure, shape, and molar mass, all as a function of one another and continuously across a sample's chromatogram. It was the author's great fortune to have gotten to know Hamish during the last decade of his life, before his passing in 2019. Here, a brief personal recollection is followed by an introduction to HDC and its application, in quadruple- detector packed-column mode, to the analysis of a commercial colloidal silica with an elongated shape.
Citation
Heliyon
Volume
7

Keywords

Hydrodynamic chromatography, colloids, Hamish Small, multiple detection, structure property relations

Citation

Striegel, A. (2021), Multi-Detector Hydrodynamic Chromatography of Colloids: Following in Hamish Small's Footsteps, Heliyon, [online], https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2021.e06691, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=931497 (Accessed May 23, 2024)

Issues

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Created April 27, 2021, Updated February 23, 2022