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Molecular Pathology: Role in Improving Patient Outcome Impact of DNA Typing on Standards and Practice in the Forensic Community

Published

Author(s)

D J. Reeder

Abstract

This paper reviews the history of DNA-based human identification from its inception in 1985. From the beginning of the technology, experts called for setting of standards and use of proficiency tests for quality assurance measures.The response of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to DNA forensic standards needs was catalyzed by the Technical Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (TWGDAM), sponsored by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) with funding provided by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). Standard Reference Materials, SRMs, were developed for the original technologies used in DNA identification as well as for the newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technologies. Adoption of recommended Standards developed through the FBI-commissioned DNA Advisory Board show the acceptance of NIST standards for calibration of laboratory protocols.New technologies will require a process of validation and continued testing through the use of proficiency tests, such as those provided through the College of American Pathologists. Robotics and parallel processing of samples will lead to increased efficiency in DNA testing.The use of DNA databanks of convicted felons will increase dramatically with the FBI s national implementation of a computerized identification system known as the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS). This system that will make major use of Short Tandem Repeat genetic systems and will be the major driver of technology for the next five to ten years.Finally, sample collection and training are of major concern for those who look at the long-term impact of DNA testing in forensic laboratories.
Proceedings Title
CAP Conf. XXXIV - Molecular Pathology: Role in Improving Patient Outcome
Conference Dates
February 27-28, 1999
Conference Location
Undefined
Conference Title
CAP Conference

Keywords

DNA, forensic testing, standards

Citation

Reeder, D. (2008), Molecular Pathology: Role in Improving Patient Outcome Impact of DNA Typing on Standards and Practice in the Forensic Community, CAP Conf. XXXIV - Molecular Pathology: Role in Improving Patient Outcome, Undefined (Accessed April 18, 2024)
Created October 16, 2008