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Modeling of Suspension Flow in a Pipe Geometry and Rheometers

Published

Author(s)

Nicos Martys, Chiara F. Ferraris, William L. George

Abstract

Abstract Measurement and prediction of the flow of suspensions like cement based materials represents a significant challenge for both the experimentalist and modeler. In this paper, results of a computational study of suspension flow in a pipe and a rheometer design using a four blade vane as an impellor are given. The computational method utilized is based on the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach. Flow fields and the spatial distribution of solid spherical inclusions for the case of pipe flow will be shown as a function of the matrix fluid properties, (including Newtonian, shear thinning and shear thickening), driving force, and volume fraction of particles. A strong effective slip phenomenon is shown for the case of a suspension with a shear thinning fluid matrix. Results will be compared to experiments. Aspects of shear induced migration in a vane rheometer and its effects on rheological measurements will be briefly discussed.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 8th International RILEM Symposium in Self-Compacting Concrete- PRO100, ed.
Conference Dates
May 15-18, 2016
Conference Location
Washington, GU
Conference Title
SCC 2016

Keywords

Rheology, Concrete, Non-Newtonian, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

Citation

Martys, N. , Ferraris, C. and George, W. (2016), Modeling of Suspension Flow in a Pipe Geometry and Rheometers, Proceedings of the 8th International RILEM Symposium in Self-Compacting Concrete- PRO100, ed., Washington, GU, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=919902 (Accessed August 19, 2022)
Created May 18, 2016, Updated February 19, 2017