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Microwave Dielectric Properties of Single-Crystal KTaO3 and SrTiO3 at Cryogenic Temperatures

Published

Author(s)

Richard G. Geyer, Jerzy Krupka, Billy F. Riddle, L. A. Boatner

Abstract

Microwave dielectric properties of single-crystal incipient ferroelectrics, KTaO3 and SrTiO3, have been measured at cryogenic temperatures. Cylindrical specimens were used as TEon1 mode and quasi-TE011 mode dielectric resonators at temperatures ranging from 4K to 300K. Conductive losses of the measurement resonant structures were taken into account, both as a function of frequency and temperature, so that uncertainties in the evaluated dielectric losses were plus or minus}0.5%. The evaluated real permittivities of KTaO3 and SrTiO3 exhibit no ferroelectric transition, and remain paraelectric down to 4 K, consistent with soft mode stabilization by zero-point quantum flucuations. Dielectric loss tangent values of KTaO3 at 3GHz were 4.2x10-5 at 5.4 K, 8.9x10-5 at 77 K, and 1.4x10^4^ at 300K, while those of srTiO3 were 3.4x10-3 at 5.4K, 2.4x104 at 77K, and 3.8x104 at 300 K. Results of the complex permittivity measurements are compared with theoretical predictions from a modified Devonshire phenomenological model.
Citation
Journal of Applied Physics
Issue
97

Keywords

dielectric properties, ferroelectrics

Citation

Geyer, R. , Krupka, J. , Riddle, B. and Boatner, L. (2005), Microwave Dielectric Properties of Single-Crystal KTaO<sub>3</sub> and SrTiO<sub>3</sub> at Cryogenic Temperatures, Journal of Applied Physics (Accessed May 27, 2024)

Issues

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Created May 9, 2005, Updated October 12, 2021