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Micro Channel Heat Transfer, Pressure Drop and Macro Prediction Methods

Published

Author(s)

Mark A. Kedzierski

Abstract

Advances in the basic understanding of fluid physics have opened an era of unprecedented application of heat transfer processes, and fluid dynamics systems using micro channels. One of the greatest obstacles to the application of leading edge fluid physics science is the lack of engineering tools. For example, is it appropriate to use macro predictive methods for sizing micro channels for desired single-phase heat transfer and pressure drop? Some published data on friction characteristics in micro-channels shows a significant disparity between micro-channel data and macro-channel predictions. In short, single-phase laminar and turbulent heat transfer and pressure drops in micro-channels can differ greatly from macro scale predictions. Several phenomena are examined in terms of potentially causing a difference between "micro" measurements and "macro" prediction methods. Expressions for the tube diameter for which these factors become important are calculated. Three data sets from the literature were examined to determine if the "micro factors" were pertinent to the measurements.
Conference Dates
June 23-26, 2003
Conference Location
Zambia
Conference Title
2nd International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics

Keywords

heat transfer, micro-channel, single phase

Citation

Kedzierski, M. (2003), Micro Channel Heat Transfer, Pressure Drop and Macro Prediction Methods, 2nd International Conference on Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Zambia, -1, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860901 (Accessed April 14, 2024)
Created June 1, 2003, Updated February 19, 2017