Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Measurement and Control of Metal Flow-Rate in a Gas-Metal Atomizer

Published

Author(s)

Stephen D. Ridder

Abstract

Research at NIST on the production of metal powder by gas atomization has focused on the development of sensors for use in PC based control systems. The ultimate goal is an inexpensive, robust means to automate the process that will improve powder quality and increase process efficiency. The intent of the work reported here was the development of a robust liquid metal flow-rate sensor for use in commercial gas-metal atomizers and suitable for use in a process control feedback loop. Various metal flow-rate devices were tested and/or evaluated. These included strain sensors to measure the mass change of the crucible, inductive core loss, continuous melt mass sensing with gamma-rays, eddy current sensors of liquid metal flow, metallostatic head measurement with a bubbler tube, and the calculation of metal flow-rate from temperature measurements using an energy balance. The relative merits of each technique will be discussed and a robust means for the measurement and control of the Gas to Metal mass flow-rate Raio (GMR) will be explained.
Citation
Proceedings of the 2002 World Congress on Powder Metallurgy & Particle Materials

Keywords

flow-rate control, flow-rate measurement, metal atomization, metal flow-rate

Citation

Ridder, S. (2002), Measurement and Control of Metal Flow-Rate in a Gas-Metal Atomizer, Proceedings of the 2002 World Congress on Powder Metallurgy & Particle Materials (Accessed May 26, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created January 1, 2002, Updated February 17, 2017