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A Low Thermal Error Sampling Comparator for Accurate Settling Measurements

Published

Author(s)

David I. Bergman, Bryan C. Waltrip

Abstract

A new sampling comparator design employing a signal-dependent biasing scheme is described. The dynamic bias significantly reduces signal-induced thermal error in the comparator. The circuit design approach is applicable to comparators intended for use in equivalent-time, successive approximation analog-to-digital conversion where required bandwidths may exceed 1 GHz and digitizing resolution may be as high as 16 bits. The technique is well suited for high accuracy settling measurements where thermal tail error can undermine the achievable settling response of an otherwise high bandwidth sampler. The new comparator design is a logical follow-up to previous work in which front-end bias on/off switching was employed. A prototype circuit has been fabricated in a 1.5 um BiCMOS process. In the prototype device, the technique reduces settling error at 300 ns from 800 uV/V to 80 uV/V and improves gain flatness to within 300 uV/V from dc to 1 MHz.
Proceedings Title
A Low Thermal Error Sampling Comparator for Accurate Settling Measurements
Conference Dates
May 23-26, 2004
Conference Location
Vancouver, 1, CA

Keywords

approximation., Comparator, dynamic bias, equivalent-time, settling, successive

Citation

Bergman, D. and Waltrip, B. (2004), A Low Thermal Error Sampling Comparator for Accurate Settling Measurements, A Low Thermal Error Sampling Comparator for Accurate Settling Measurements, Vancouver, 1, CA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=31519 (Accessed April 18, 2024)
Created December 31, 2003, Updated October 12, 2021