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Long distance optical frequency transfer over fiber: predicting the frequency stability from the fiber noise

Published

Author(s)

Nathan R. Newbury, Paul A. Williams, William C. Swann

Abstract

We have recently demonstrated the coherent transfer of an optical signal over a 251 km link of optical fiber by use of the standard Doppler-cancellation approach to remove the effects of the fiber-link noise. The fundamental limit to the frequency instability on the transmitted optical frequency is set by residual phase noise on the optical frequency resulting from the unavoidably imperfect Doppler cancellation of the fiber-link noise. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to quantitatively predict the phase noise and instability of the Doppler-cancelled transmitted optical frequency directly from the measured fiber-link noise. The ability to predict the frequency instability from the measured fiber noise can be a useful tool in evaluating whether a coherent fiber optic link is operating at its fundamental limit, or whether there is additional excess noise from the measurement system present in the link.
Proceedings Title
2008 IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium
Conference Dates
May 19-21, 2008
Conference Location
Honolulu, HI, US

Keywords

frequency combs, frequency transfer

Citation

Newbury, N. , Williams, P. and Swann, W. (2008), Long distance optical frequency transfer over fiber: predicting the frequency stability from the fiber noise, 2008 IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium, Honolulu, HI, US, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=32932 (Accessed May 25, 2024)

Issues

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Created May 17, 2008, Updated October 12, 2021