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Load-Bearing Behavior of a Simulated Craniofacial Structure Fabricated From a Hydroxyapatite Cement and Bioresorbable Fiber-Mesh

Published

Author(s)

A S. Von Gonten, James F. Kelly, Joseph M. Antonucci

Abstract

lcium phosphate cements (CPC) have proven successful in the repair of small, non-stress bearing skeletal defects. These cements do not have sufficient tensile strength or fracture toughness to allow their use in stress-bearing applications. It was hypothesized that a bioresorbable fiber mesh would improve the load-bearing behavior of shell structures fabricated of CPC. This study used a biaxial flexure fixture to compare the work-to-fracture values of discs made of: (1) CPC; (2) CPC reinforced with a bioresorbable two-dimensionally oriented poly (glactin) fiber-mesh; and (3) poly (methyl methacrylate) PMMA) that were immersed in a serum-like solution for 0-23 days. CPC-mesh and PMMA discs wereindistinguishable at 0, 1 and 7 days, based on work-to-fracture data. CPC and CPC-mesh discs wewe indistinguishable at day 28, because of fiber hydrolysis. The knitted fiber-mesh was effective in improving load-bearing behavior of a calcium phosphate cement for potential structural repair of bone defects.
Citation
Journal of Materials Science
Volume
11

Keywords

craniofacial structure, hydroxyapatite cement

Citation

Von Gonten, A. , Kelly, J. and Antonucci, J. (1999), Load-Bearing Behavior of a Simulated Craniofacial Structure Fabricated From a Hydroxyapatite Cement and Bioresorbable Fiber-Mesh, Journal of Materials Science (Accessed June 12, 2024)

Issues

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Created August 31, 1999, Updated October 12, 2021