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Large Area Pt/n-GaN Schottky Photodiodes With Extremely Low Leakage Current

Published

Author(s)

A Shahid, Robert E. Vest, D Franz, F Yan, Y Zhao, D B. Mott

Abstract

Pt/n-type GaN Schottky photodiodes with very large active areas (0.25 cm2 and 1 cmu2) which exhibit extremely low leakage currents at low reverse bias are reported. The Schottky photodiodes were fabricated from n-/n+ epitaxial layers grown by low pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy on single crystal c-plane sapphire. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of several 0.25 cmu2n devices are presented together with the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of one of these devices. A leakage current as low as 14 pA at 0.5 V reverse bias is reported, for a 0.25 cm2 diode. A peak responsivity of 71 mA/W at 320nm is reported for one of the fabricated devices, corresponding to a spectral detectivity, 4.62x10u14 cm Hzu1/2 Wu-1. The spatial responsivity uniformity variation was established, using Hd2u Lyman -alpha radiation, to be -+3% across the surface of a typical 0.25 cmu2d diode.
Citation
Large Area Pt/n-GaN Schottky Photodiodes With Extremely Low Leakage Current

Keywords

material identification, radiation transport theory, scanning transmission electron microscop, tomography

Citation

Shahid, A. , Vest, R. , Franz, D. , Yan, F. , Zhao, Y. and Mott, D. (2004), Large Area Pt/n-GaN Schottky Photodiodes With Extremely Low Leakage Current, Large Area Pt/n-GaN Schottky Photodiodes With Extremely Low Leakage Current (Accessed May 19, 2024)

Issues

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Created August 18, 2004, Updated October 12, 2021