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Kramers-Kronig analysis of attenuation and dispersion in trabecular bonea

Published

Author(s)

Kendall Waters, B K. Hoffmeister

Abstract

A restricted-bandwidth form of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations is applied to in vitro measurements of ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion properties of trabecular bone specimens from bovine tibia. The Kramers-Kronig analysis utilizes only experimentally measured properties and avoids having to extrapolate the form of the ultrasonic properties beyond the known bandwidth. Compensation for the portions of the Kramers-Kronig integrals over the unknown bandwidth is achieved in part by the use of the method of subtractions in which a subtraction frequency acts as an adjustable parameter. Good agreement is found between experimentally measured and Kramers-Kronig reconstructed dispersions. The restricted-bandwidth approach improves upon applications of other forms of the Kramers-Kronig relations and may potentially provide further insight into how ultrasound interacts with trabecular bone.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control
Volume
118
Issue
6

Keywords

attenuation, cancellous bone, dispersion, fracture risk, Kramers-Kronig relations, osteoporosis, quantitative ultrasound, trabecular bone

Citation

Waters, K. and Hoffmeister, B. (2005), Kramers-Kronig analysis of attenuation and dispersion in trabecular bonea, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, [online], https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2126934 (Accessed June 22, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 1, 2005, Updated January 27, 2020