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Keys to the Enhanced Performance of Mercuric Iodide Radiation Detectors Provided by Diffraction Imaging

Published

Author(s)

B W. Steiner, L van den Berg, U Laor

Abstract

High resolution monochomatic diffraction imaging is playing a central role in the optimization of novel high energy radiation detectors for superior energy resolution at room temperature. In the early days of the space program, the electronic transport properties of mercuric iodide crystals grown in microgravity provided irrefutable evidence that substantial property improvement was possible. Through diffraction imaging, this superiority has been traced to the absence of inclusions. At the same time, other types of irregularity have been shown to be surprisingly less influential. As a result of the knowledge gained from these observation, terrestrial crystal uniformity has been modified greatly, and their electronic properties enhanced. Progress toward property optimization through structural control is described.
Proceedings Title
Synchrotron Radiation Techniques to Material Science, Symposium | 5th | Synchrotron Radiation Techniques to Material Science | Materials Research Society
Volume
590
Conference Dates
November 1, 1999
Conference Title
Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings

Keywords

crystal defects, diffraction imaging, mercuric iodide, synchrotron radiation, topography

Citation

Steiner, B. , Van, L. and Laor, U. (2000), Keys to the Enhanced Performance of Mercuric Iodide Radiation Detectors Provided by Diffraction Imaging, Synchrotron Radiation Techniques to Material Science, Symposium | 5th | Synchrotron Radiation Techniques to Material Science | Materials Research Society (Accessed April 22, 2024)
Created July 1, 2000, Updated February 19, 2017