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Investigation of the potential use of hyperspectral imaging for stand-off detection of person-borne IEDs

Published

Author(s)

P. Yvonne Barnes, David W. Allen

Abstract

Advances in hyperspectral sensors and algorithms in numerous fields of research have opened up new possibilities for its use in the detection of person-borne IEDs. While portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as the x-ray and terahertz regions, have been investigated for this application, the spectral region of the ultraviolet (UV) through shortwave infrared (SWIR) (250 nm to 2500 nm) has received little attention. The purpose of this work was to investigate what, if any, potential there may be for exploiting the spectral region of the UV through SWIR for the detection of hidden objects under the clothing of individuals. The optical properties of both common fabrics and threat objects were measured. The approach, measurement methods, and results are described in this paper, and the potential for hyperspectral imaging is addressed.
Proceedings Title
Detection and Sensing of Mines, Explosive Objects, and Obscured Targets XVI
Volume
8017
Conference Dates
April 25-29, 2011
Conference Location
Orlando, FL, US
Conference Title
SPIE Defense, Security, and Sensing 2011

Keywords

fabrics, stand-off detection, transmittance, reflectance, hyperspectral, optical

Citation

Barnes, P. and Allen, D. (2011), Investigation of the potential use of hyperspectral imaging for stand-off detection of person-borne IEDs, Detection and Sensing of Mines, Explosive Objects, and Obscured Targets XVI, Orlando, FL, US (Accessed June 15, 2024)

Issues

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Created May 22, 2011, Updated October 12, 2021