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Integrated Simulation and Gaming Architecture for Incident Management Training

Published

Author(s)

Sanjay Jain, Charles R. McLean

Abstract

The simulation-based training systems that are available or under development today for incident management are typically focused on macro level sequence of events. A few systems targeted at individual responders are under development using a gaming environment. Separate uses of such systems provide disparate experiences to decision makers and individual responders. There is a need to pro-vide common training experiences to these groups for bet-ter effectiveness. This paper presents a novel approach in-tegrating gaming and simulation systems for training of decisions makers and responders on the same scenarios preparing them to work together as a team. An integrated systems architecture is proposed for this purpose. Major modules in gaming and simulation subsystems are defined and interaction mechanisms established. Research and standards issues for implementation of the proposed archi-tecture are discussed.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 2005 Winter Simulation Conference
Conference Location
, USA

Keywords

gaming architecture, integrated systems architecture, simlation-based training, simulation

Citation

Jain, S. and McLean, C. (2005), Integrated Simulation and Gaming Architecture for Incident Management Training, Proceedings of the 2005 Winter Simulation Conference, , USA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=822320 (Accessed June 20, 2024)

Issues

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Created August 31, 2005, Updated October 12, 2021