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Influence of Particle Size and Solid Loading on the Determination of the Isoelectric Point (IEP) of Ceramics Powders by Different Methods

Published

Author(s)

Hisashi Abe, M Naito, R Wasche, Vincent A. Hackley, Y Hotta

Abstract

The isoelectric point is a material property for the characterization of acid-base behavior of the powder surface. The IEP of two alumina powders (AKP-30 Grade A) with different particle size characteristics in aqueous suspension has been determined by colloid vibration current (CVI) and particle charge detection (PCD) methods in moderately concentrated suspensions in order to qualify these methods for a future standardization. The solid loading of the suspensions were 1 and 5 vol%. The comparison of the IEP determined by PCD and CVI was in good agreement. However, the solid loading dependence of IEP and a large IEP hysteresis (at 1 vol%) were observed, which do not allow a proper determination of the IEP. The recording of the potential curve and therefore the determination of the IEP with CVI was difficult for the suspension of GRade A powder due to for-mation of agglomerates at pH values near the pHIEP.
Citation
Key Engineering Methods

Keywords

alumina, ceramics, colloid vibration current, electrokinetic sonic amplitude, isoelectric point, particle charge detection, particle size, streaming potential

Citation

Abe, H. , Naito, M. , Wasche, R. , Hackley, V. and Hotta, Y. (2001), Influence of Particle Size and Solid Loading on the Determination of the Isoelectric Point (IEP) of Ceramics Powders by Different Methods, Key Engineering Methods (Accessed June 23, 2024)

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Created August 31, 2001, Updated October 12, 2021