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Increased interference fringe visibility from the post fabrication heat treatment of a perfect crystal silicon neutron interferometer

Published

Author(s)

Michael G. Huber, Muhammad D. Arif, Thomas H. Gnaupel-Herold, Michelle E. Jamer, Ben Heacock, David G. Cory, R. Haun, Joachim Nsofini, Dimitry A. Pushin, Ivar Taminiau, A.R. Young

Abstract

We find that annealing a previously chemically etched interferometer at 800 °C dramatically increased the interference fringe visibility from 23 % to 90 %. The Bragg plane misalignments were also measured before and after annealing using neutron rocking curves, showing that Bragg plane alignment was improved across the interferometer after annealing. This suggests that current interferometers with low fringe visibility may be salvageable and that annealing may become an important step in the fabrication process of future neutron interferometers, leading to less need for chemical etching and larger more exotic neutron interferometers.
Citation
Review of Scientific Instruments
Volume
89

Keywords

neutron interferometry

Citation

Huber, M. , Arif, M. , , T. , Jamer, M. , Heacock, B. , Cory, D. , Haun, R. , Nsofini, J. , Pushin, D. , Taminiau, I. and Young, A. (2018), Increased interference fringe visibility from the post fabrication heat treatment of a perfect crystal silicon neutron interferometer, Review of Scientific Instruments, [online], https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5008273, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=924839 (Accessed July 21, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created February 8, 2018, Updated May 3, 2021