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HYDRATED PHASES IN BLENDED CEMENTITIOUS SYSTEMS FOR NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE

Published

Author(s)

Kenneth A. Snyder, Paul E. Stutzman, Jacob Philip, David W. Esh

Abstract

The hydration products of varying proportions of portland cement, fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, and silica fume in blended systems were identified and quantified. The proportion of portland cement varied from 100 % down to 10 %. The initial components were characterized by the oxide content, and all the pastes were made at constant water:cementitious material mass ratio. The hydrated paste samples were analyzed using Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction and using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The estimated type and quantity of phases present were compared to current thermodynamic models for blended cement hydration. Results are given after three months hydration, and the research program is part of a year-long study that will later include X-ray microanalysis and pore solution analysis. The final results from this experiment will be used to validate performance assessment computer models for nuclear applications.
Proceedings Title
NUCPERF 2009 Proceeding
Conference Dates
March 30-April 2, 2009
Conference Location
Cadarache
Conference Title
NUCPERF 2009 Conference Proceedings

Keywords

cement, Rietveld analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction

Citation

Snyder, K. , Stutzman, P. , Philip, J. and Esh, D. (2009), HYDRATED PHASES IN BLENDED CEMENTITIOUS SYSTEMS FOR NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE, NUCPERF 2009 Proceeding, Cadarache, -1, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=902278 (Accessed April 22, 2024)
Created October 15, 2009, Updated February 19, 2017