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High-Resolution Rb Two-Photon Spectroscopy With Ultrafast Lasers

Published

Author(s)

T H. Yoon, A Marian, John L. Hall, Jun Ye

Abstract

A two-photon wmsition in cold Rb atoms will be probed with a phase-coherent wide-bandwidth femtosecond laser comb. Frequency domainanalysis yields a high resolution picture where phase coherence among various transition pathways through different intermediate states produces interference effects on the resonantly-enhanced transition probability. This result is supported by the time domain Ramsey interference effect. The two-photon transition spectrum is analyzed in terms of the pulse repetition rate and carrier frequency offset, leading to a cold-atom-based frequency stabilization scheme for both degrees of freedom of the femtosecond laser.
Proceedings Title
Laser Frequency Stabilization, Standards, Measurement, and Applications, Conference || Laser Frequency Stabilization, Standards, Measurement, and Applications | SPIE
Volume
4269
Conference Dates
January 1, 2001
Conference Location
Undefined
Conference Title
Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering

Keywords

femtosecond comb, quantum interference, spectroscopy

Citation

Yoon, T. , Marian, A. , Hall, J. and Ye, J. (2001), High-Resolution Rb Two-Photon Spectroscopy With Ultrafast Lasers, Laser Frequency Stabilization, Standards, Measurement, and Applications, Conference || Laser Frequency Stabilization, Standards, Measurement, and Applications | SPIE, Undefined (Accessed May 23, 2024)

Issues

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Created April 30, 2001, Updated October 12, 2021