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The Glass Transition: Its Measurement and Underlying Physics

Published

Author(s)

G B. McKenna, S L. Simon

Abstract

The glass transition is an important phenomenon in the practical world, where it determines the use temperature and processing temperature for many materials, particularly polymers. In addition, the underlying physics of glassy materials, while extensively studied, are still rich in phenomena that are not fully understood and still lead to conflict within the scientific community. Here, we describe both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the glass transition event and discuss some of the underlying physics of glass forming materials as well as how we currently describe the phenomenology. We, then, briefly discuss some of the techniques used to measure the glass transition temperature. Our review ends with a brief discussion of the effects of structural recovery on viscoelastic properties and the engineering properties of polymers--a process that has come to be known as physical aging.
Citation
The Glass Transition: Its Measurement and Underlying Physics
Volume
ume 3
Publisher Info
Handbook of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry ,

Keywords

enthalpy recovery, glass, glass transition, physical aging, polymer glass, structural recovery, TNM-KAHR model

Citation

McKenna, G. and Simon, S. (2008), The Glass Transition: Its Measurement and Underlying Physics, Handbook of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry , (Accessed May 28, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 16, 2008