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Generic Case Studies for Manufacturing Simulation Applications

Published

Author(s)

Charles R. McLean, Guodong Shao

Abstract

Manufacturing managers typically commission simulation case studies to support their decision-making processes. These studies are used to evaluate alternative solutions to manufacturing problems in areas such as plant layout, scheduling, capacity planning, capital equipment acquisition, inventory management, and supply chain planning. Procedures for performing case studies vary from organization to organization, and situation to situation. It is possible that two different simulation analysts faced with the same manufacturing problem would perform their case studies differently, obtain different results, and reach different conclusions. The authors contend that standardization of the case study methodology and development of generic case studies would increase the likelihood that the simulation process will be deterministic, i.e., produce repeatable results. This paper presents background on case studies and makes recommendations concerning the advancement of manufacturing simulation case study methods and practices.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 2003 Winter Simulation Conference
Conference Dates
December 7-10, 2003
Conference Location
New Orleans, LA, USA

Keywords

case studies, modeling, simulation, standards, templates

Citation

McLean, C. and Shao, G. (2003), Generic Case Studies for Manufacturing Simulation Applications, Proceedings of the 2003 Winter Simulation Conference, New Orleans, LA, USA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=822047 (Accessed April 14, 2024)
Created July 31, 2003, Updated October 12, 2021