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Generalizations of the R-Matrix Method to the Treatment of the Interaction of Short Pulse Electromagnetic Radiation with Atoms

Published

Author(s)

Barry I. Schneider, klaus bartschat, Kathryn Hamilton

Abstract

Since its initial development in the 1970s by Phil Burke and his collaborators, the R-matrix theory and associated computer codes have become the method of choice for the calculation of accurate data for general electron–atom/ion/molecule collision and photoionization processes. The use of a non-orthogonal set of orbitals based on B-splines, now called the B-spline R-matrix (BSR) approach, was pioneered by Zatsarinny. It has considerably extended the flexibility of the approach and improved particularly the treatment of complex many-electron atomic and ionic targets, for which accurate data are needed in many modelling applications for processes involving low-temperature plasmas. Both the original R-matrix approach and the BSR method have been extended to the interaction of short, intense electromagnetic (EM) radiation with atoms and molecules. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical tools that were required to facilitate the extension of the theory to the time domain. As an example of a practical application, we show results for two-photon ionization of argon by intense short-pulse extreme ultraviolet radiation.
Citation
Atoms

Keywords

short-pulse laser-atom interactions, time-dependent Schrödinger equation, B-spline R-matrix, R-matrix with time dependence, Arnoldi–Lanczos propagation

Citation

Schneider, B. , Bartschat, K. and Hamilton, K. (2022), Generalizations of the R-Matrix Method to the Treatment of the Interaction of Short Pulse Electromagnetic Radiation with Atoms, Atoms, [online], https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms10010026, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=934372 (Accessed April 23, 2024)
Created February 22, 2022, Updated March 27, 2024