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Force Control of Linear Motor Stages for Microassembly

Published

Author(s)

Jason J. Gorman, Nicholas Dagalakis

Abstract

The microassembly of microelectromechanical systems from various micro-components requires the development of many new robotic capabilities. One of these capabilities is force control for handling micro-scale components with force control resolution on the order of micronewtons. In this paper, the force control of linear motor stages is discussed with application to the micorassembly of MEMS. Linear motor stages provide an attractive solution for microassembly robots because they have a large working volume and can achieve high-precision positioning. However, the nonlinear friction and force ripple effects inherent in linear stages provide an obstacle to the required level of force control. A model of a single motor stage has been developed including dynamic friction effects. Based on this model, a robust nonlinear force controller has been designed to meet the microassembly requirements. The controller has been tested in simulation to demonstrate its effectiveness.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of IMECE''03
Conference Location
Washington, MD, USA
Conference Title
2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress

Keywords

Control, force control, linear motor, Micro/Nano Systems, microassembly, Robotics & Intelligent Systems, sliding mode control

Citation

Gorman, J. and Dagalakis, N. (2003), Force Control of Linear Motor Stages for Microassembly, Proceedings of IMECE''03, Washington, MD, USA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=822478 (Accessed July 25, 2024)

Issues

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Created November 20, 2003, Updated October 12, 2021