Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Failure Modes in Ceramic-Based Layer Structures: A Basis for Materials Design of Dental Crowns

Published

Author(s)

Brian R. Lawn, Sanjit Bhowmick, M T. Bush, T Qasim, E D. Rekow, Yang Zhang

Abstract

A research program on failure modes induced by spherical indenters in brittle layer structures bonded to polymeric substrates, in simulation of occlusal function in all-ceramic dental crowns, is surveyed. Tests are made on model flat and curved layers bonded onto a dentin-like polymer base, in bilayer (ceramic/polymer) and trilayer (ceramic/ceramic/polymer) configurations. All-transparent systems using glass as a porcelain-like outer or veneer layer and sapphire as a stiff and strong core support layer enable in situ observation of the entire evolution fracture modes in the brittle layers, from initiation through to failure. With the fracture modes identified, tests are readily extended to systems with opaque polycrystalline dental core ceramics, notably alumina and zirconia. A variety of principal failure modes is identified: outer and inner cone cracks developing in the near-contact region at the top surface; radial cracks developing at the bottom surface along the loading axis; margin cracks from the edges of dome-like structures. All of these modes are enhanced in cyclic loading by time-cumulative slow crack growth, but inner cones are subject to especially severe mechanical fatigue from hydraulic pumping of water into the crack fissures. Conditions under which each mode may be expected to dominate, particular in relation to geometrical variables (layer thickness, contact radius) and relative material properties, are outlined. Clinical issues such as crown geometry, overload versus fatigue failure, role of residual stresses in fabrication, etc. are addressed.
Citation
Journal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume
90
Issue
6

Keywords

dental crowns, fatigue, fracture modes, layer structures, material design, occlusal
Created June 30, 2007, Updated February 19, 2017