Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Eliminating the Middleman: Ultraviolet Scale Realization using a Laser-Driven Plasma Light Source

Published

Author(s)

Uwe Arp, Edward W. Hagley, Robert Vest

Abstract

After we replaced the argon mini-arc with a laser-driven light source in the Ultraviolet Spectral Comparator Facility at NIST, we realized that the optical power should be sufficient to use the comparator system for absolute-cryogenic radiometry. Calibrating working standard detectors directly against an absolute-cryogenic radiometer in the Ultraviolet Spectral Comparator Facility, thus eliminating all uncertainties resulting from the use of transfer standards, which were calibrated in a separate system with a different light source and optics. Any uncertainty caused by differences in bandpass, out-off-band radiation, spectral purity, collimation, or data interpolation would be removed. This should reduce the uncertainties of the calibrations, especially in the short-wavelength range below 220 nm. In the end we successfully set-up a twin system resembling the Ultraviolet Spectral Comparator Facility and used this system to perform a primary calibration of several photodiodes, based on an absolute- cryogenic radiometer. We refer to this system as the Ultraviolet Scale Realization Facility or UV-SRF.
Citation
Applied Optics
Volume
60
Issue
6

Keywords

radiometry, scale realization, ultraviolet, absolute-cryogenic radiometer

Citation

Arp, U. , Hagley, E. and Vest, R. (2021), Eliminating the Middleman: Ultraviolet Scale Realization using a Laser-Driven Plasma Light Source, Applied Optics, [online], https://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.414700 (Accessed September 19, 2021)
Created February 16, 2021, Updated March 1, 2021