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Electrodeposition of Transition Metal-Aluminum Alloys from Chloroaluminate from Chloroaluminate Molten Salts

Published

Author(s)

Gery R. Stafford, C L. Hussey

Abstract

Relatively little attention has been devoted to the direct electrodeposition of transition metal-aluminum alloys in spite of the fact that isothermal electrodeposition leads to coatings with very uniform composition and structure and that the deposition current gives a direct measure of the deposition rate. Unfortunately , neither aluminum nor its alloys can be electrodeposited from aqueous solutions because hydrogen is evolved before aluminum is plated. Thus it is necessary to employ nonaqueous solvents (both molecular and ionic) for this purpose. Among the solvents that have been used successfully to electrodeposit aluminum and its transition metal alloys are the chloroaluminate molten salts, which consist of inorganic or organic chloride salts combined with anhydrous aluminum chloride. An introduction to the chemical, electrochemical, and physical properties of the most commonly used chloroaluminate melts is given.
Citation
Advances in Electrochemical Science and Engineering
Volume
6

Keywords

aluminum, aluminum alloys, electrodeposition, molten salts

Citation

Stafford, G. and Hussey, C. (2002), Electrodeposition of Transition Metal-Aluminum Alloys from Chloroaluminate from Chloroaluminate Molten Salts, Advances in Electrochemical Science and Engineering (Accessed April 21, 2024)
Created January 1, 2002, Updated February 17, 2017