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The effects of the January 2016 UTC offset anomaly on GPS clocks monitored at NIST

Published

Author(s)

Jian Yao, Michael A. Lombardi, Andrew N. Novick, Bijunath Patla, Jeffrey A. Sherman, Victor S. Zhang

Abstract

Errors in the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) offset parameters broadcast by Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites caused many thousands of GPS clocks to be in error by approximately -13 µs on January 25-26, 2016. The erroneous UTC offset information was broadcast by 15 GPS satellites, or half of the available constellation, during the anomaly. This paper discusses the technical reasons for the UTC offset anomaly, its effect on GPS clocks, and how it was detected at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It then discusses the impact of the UTC offset anomaly on GPS clocks maintained and monitored by NIST, including clocks located in Boulder, Colorado and those at remote locations. Some analysis is presented of the effects of the UTC offset anomaly on GPS clocks located at 19 sites in North, Central, and South America.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 2017 ION Precise Time and Time Interval Meeting (PTTI)
Conference Dates
January 28-February 2, 2017
Conference Location
Monterey, CA

Keywords

GPS, time, UTC

Citation

Yao, J. , Lombardi, M. , Novick, A. , Patla, B. , Sherman, J. and Zhang, V. (2017), The effects of the January 2016 UTC offset anomaly on GPS clocks monitored at NIST, Proceedings of the 2017 ION Precise Time and Time Interval Meeting (PTTI), Monterey, CA (Accessed December 7, 2021)
Created January 31, 2017, Updated July 3, 2017