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Dynamic Flow Stress Measurements for Machining Applications

Published

Author(s)

Steven P. Mates, Eran Vax, Richard Rhorer, Michael B. Kennedy, Eric P. Whitenton, Stephen W. Banovic, Timothy J. Burns

Abstract

Metals undergo a combination of rapid loading and rapid heating during normal and high speed machining processes. Constitutive models for these materials, however, generally lack any information regarding kinetics of thermally-induced transformations, such as austenite formation in carbon steels, that can have profound effects on their mechanical viscoplastic behavior. The NIST electrically-pulse-heated Kolsky bar was developed specifically to probe material response under conditions approaching those present during machining operations. We have achieved heating rates in excess of 1000 °C/s combined with strain rates above 1000 s-1 with this system. This paper presents recent experimental results for AISI 1045 and AISI 1075 steel using the pulse-heated Kolsky Bar, and examines some aspects of the uncertainty of the method.
Proceedings Title
Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM) Annual Meeting
Conference Dates
June 2-5, 2014
Conference Location
Greenville, SC

Keywords

High Heating Rate, High Strain Rate, Kolsky Bar, Machining, Steel

Citation

Mates, S. , Vax, E. , Rhorer, R. , Kennedy, M. , Whitenton, E. , Banovic, S. and Burns, T. (2014), Dynamic Flow Stress Measurements for Machining Applications, Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM) Annual Meeting, Greenville, SC, [online], https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-06995-1 (Accessed June 15, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 19, 2014, Updated February 6, 2020