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The Development of a High-Throughput Axisymmetric Adhesion Test

Published

Author(s)

Aaron M. Forster, Wenhua Zhang, Christopher Stafford

Abstract

There has been a growing effort to extend combinatorial and high throughput (C&HT) methods into many aspects of material science, including material property screening and materials discovery. In material science, a prevalent approach to combinatorial library design is to incorporate continuous material property gradients across a specimen. Gradients provide convenient access to a large parameter space, tunable by the range and slope of property change along the sample. New toolsets are continually required to quantify material properties along these gradients. The multilens combinatorial adhesion test (MCAT) was created to conduct parallel axisymmetric adhesion tests across gradient substrates. The ability to model contact behavior using the displacement form of the JKR equation demonstrates that the multilens technique measures the work of adhesion simultaneously at multiple contact points. Similar values of the work of adhesion were obtained for both soft and rigid hemispheres.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings | 28th | Annual Meeting
Conference Dates
February 13-16, 2005
Conference Location
Gaithersburg, MD, US
Conference Title
Adhesion Society

Keywords

adhesion, combinatorial, high-throughput, JKR, multilens

Citation

Forster, A. , Zhang, W. and Stafford, C. (2005), The Development of a High-Throughput Axisymmetric Adhesion Test, Proceedings | 28th | Annual Meeting, Gaithersburg, MD, US, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=852531 (Accessed May 30, 2024)

Issues

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Created February 12, 2005, Updated October 12, 2021