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Development of ASTM C 1421-99 Standard Test Methods for Determination of Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics

Published

Author(s)

I Bar-On, George D. Quinn, J A. Salem, M J. Jenkins

Abstract

ASTM C1421, Standard Test Methods for Determination of Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics at Ambient temperature, is a high-quality, technically rigorous, full-concensus standard that may have finally answered the question, What is the 'real' fracture toughness of ceramics? This document was eight years in the actual standardization process (although an estimated two decades of preparation work may have preceded the actual standardization process). Three different types of notch/crack geometries are employed in flexure beams: single edge precracked beam (SEPB); surface; chevron-notched beam (CNB); and crack in flexure (SCF). Extensive experimental, analytical, and numerical evaluations were conducted in order to mitigate interferences that frequently lower the accuracy of fracture toughness test results. Several round robins (e.g., VAMAS) verified and validated the choice of dimensions and test parameters included in the standard. In addition, the Standard Reference Material NIST SRM 2100 was developed and can be used in concert with ASTM C1421 to validate a fracture toughness test setup or test protocol.
Citation
American Society for Testing and Materials

Keywords

ASTM C1421, ceramics, chevron-notched beam, fracture toughness, single edge precracked beam, surface crack in flexure

Citation

Bar-On, I. , Quinn, G. , Salem, J. and Jenkins, M. (2003), Development of ASTM C 1421-99 Standard Test Methods for Determination of Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics, American Society for Testing and Materials (Accessed April 21, 2024)
Created October 22, 2003, Updated October 12, 2021