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Curing of High-Performance Concrete for Strength: Phase I Study

Published

Author(s)

Nicholas J. Carino, K W. Meeks

Abstract

This paper reports the results of an exploratory study on the effects of curing duration on the variation of mortar strength with distance from the drying surface. A novel, notched cylindrical test specimen was adopted for measuring tensile strength at different depths. Two mortar mixtures with w/c of 0.30 and 0.45 were used; the former was assumed to be representative of the paste system in a high-performance concrete. Specimens were moist cured for (1, 3, or 7) d and then exposed to air at 25 C and 50 % or 70 % RH. The cylinders were sealed to simulate one-dimensional drying in a large member. Tensile strengths were measured at 28 d. Relationships between tensile strength and depth were compared with those of specimens continuously moist cured. The data tended to show that 1 d of moist curing might be sufficient to ensure adequate strength development at a depth of 25 mm from the exposed surface. The phenomenon of increasing strength with drying may have confounded the results, and recommendations for additional studies are provided.
Citation
NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR) - 6505
Report Number
6505

Keywords

building technology, curing, high-performance concrete, mortar, statistical analysis, tensile strength

Citation

Carino, N. and Meeks, K. (2001), Curing of High-Performance Concrete for Strength: Phase I Study, NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR), National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860272 (Accessed December 2, 2023)
Created April 1, 2001, Updated February 19, 2017