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Correlations Between the Crystallographic Texture and Grain Boundary Character in Polycrystalline Materials

Published

Author(s)

R E. Garcia, Mark D. Vaudin

Abstract

A method is presented to determine the misorientation probability distribution function in polycrystalline materials based on a known, analytical or numerical, representation of the associated orientation probability distribution function, i.e., texture. The proposed formulation incorporates the local grain to grain orientation correlations by combining local or macroscopic statistical information, and finds a natural interpretation through the well-known stereographic projection (pole-figure) representation. The proposed formulation distinguishes between anti-parallel crystallographic orientations, as well as cone-angle and polar angle misorientations. For fiber-textured samples, it is quantitatively shown that highly oriented samples are equivalent to polycrystals with a high density of low angle misorientations, while completely random (untextured) materials are equivalent to microstructures with a high probability of large angle misorientations .
Citation
Acta Crystallographica Section D-Biological Crystallography

Keywords

fiber texture, March-Dollase function, misorientation distribution function

Citation

Garcia, R. and Vaudin, M. (2007), Correlations Between the Crystallographic Texture and Grain Boundary Character in Polycrystalline Materials, Acta Crystallographica Section D-Biological Crystallography (Accessed June 20, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 31, 2006, Updated October 12, 2021