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Computer Modelling of Interfacial Transition Zone: Microstructure and Properties.

Published

Author(s)

Dale P. Bentz, Edward J. Garboczi

Abstract

Many of the experimental advances in understanding interfacial transition zone (ITZ) microstructure and its role in the performance of cement-based composites have been either initiated or accompanied by advances in the computer modelliug of ITZ microstructure and properties. In the early stages of research in this area, conceptual models explaining ITZ formation and structure were proposed. With the advances in computational capability in recent years, these conceptual models have been substantiated and further developed via computer simulations. This chapter provides a review of the computational techniques that have been employed in these simulations and the results obtained, covering both ITZ formation and structure and the resulting effect on the properties of cement-based materials.
Proceedings Title
Engineering and Transport Properties of the Interfacial Transition Zone in Cementitious Composites. RILEM Report No. 20. Proceedings. Part 5. Chapter 20
Conference Dates
January 1, 1999
Conference Location
Cedex,

Keywords

computer models, zone models, microstructure, concretes, durability, interfacial transition zone

Citation

Bentz, D. and Garboczi, E. (1999), Computer Modelling of Interfacial Transition Zone: Microstructure and Properties., Engineering and Transport Properties of the Interfacial Transition Zone in Cementitious Composites. RILEM Report No. 20. Proceedings. Part 5. Chapter 20, Cedex, , [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=917007 (Accessed December 2, 2023)
Created January 1, 1999, Updated February 17, 2017