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A Comparison of an R22 and an R410A Air Conditioner Operating at High Ambient Temperatures

Published

Author(s)

William V. Payne, Piotr A. Domanski

Abstract

R22 and R410A split air-conditioning systems were tested and compared as outdoor temperature ranged form 27.8 C (82.0 F) to 54.4 F (130 F). The R410A system tests were extended t 68.3 C (155.0 F) ambient temperature with a customized compressor. Capacity and efficiency of both systems decreased linearly with increasing outdoor temperature, but the R410A system performance degraded more than the R22 system performance. Operation of the R410A system was stable during all tests, including those with the customized compressor extending up to the 68.3 F (155.0 F) outdoor temperature and resulting in a supercritical condition at the condenser inlet. No noticeable changes in noise level or operation on the system was noted.
Proceedings Title
International Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Conference | 9th | | Purdue University
Conference Dates
July 16-19, 2002
Conference Location
Undefined
Conference Title
Proceedings of the International Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Conference at Purdue

Keywords

capacity, COP (EER), high ambient, R22, R410A

Citation

Payne, W. and Domanski, P. (2002), A Comparison of an R22 and an R410A Air Conditioner Operating at High Ambient Temperatures, International Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Conference | 9th | | Purdue University, Undefined, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860880 (Accessed May 21, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created June 30, 2002, Updated October 12, 2021