Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Characterizing water transport in ultrathin desalination membranes using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation

Published

Author(s)

Nichole Nadermann, Edwin P. Chan, Christopher M. Stafford

Abstract

We study the water transport and swelling properties of an ultrathin polyamide selective layer with a hydroxyl-rich polymer coating, i.e., a polymer bilayer, using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Specifically, we use QCM-D to measure the dynamic and equilibrium change in mass in a series of differential sorption experiments to determine the dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient and equilibrium swelling of the bilayer as a function of the water vapor activity. We apply a bilayer mass transport model to deconvolute the contributions of the polyamide selective layer and the hydroxyl-rich coating to the mass sorption kinetics obtained from QCM-D. We show that the swelling and water diffusion coefficients can be described according to the Painter-Shenoy polymer network swelling model and the solution-diffusion model, respectively.
Citation
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume
7
Issue
6

Keywords

Bilayer mass transport, Coating, Desalination, Diffusion, Polyamide, QCM-D, Reverse Osmosis

Citation

Nadermann, N. , Chan, E. and Stafford, C. (2015), Characterizing water transport in ultrathin desalination membranes using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, [online], https://doi.org/10.1021/am507091s (Accessed June 15, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created January 19, 2015, Updated November 10, 2018