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Characterization of Atomized High Nitrogen Stainless Steel as a Possible Implant Material

Published

Author(s)

Frank S. Biancaniello, Rodney D. Jiggetts, Richard E. Ricker, Stephen D. Ridder

Abstract

High Nitrogen Stainless Steel (HNSS) can simultaneously have high strength (ultimate and yield), high hardness, high ductility, and outstanding corrosion properties. These properties can be further improved if these HNSS materials are produced from Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) consolidated, gas atomized powder due to the resulting microstructural refinement and increased chemical homogeneity that this Rapid Solidification Processing (RSP) imparts. This unusual combination of properties and the additional advantages of RSP near net shape manufacturing should make HNSS an excellent candidate for hip and knee prostheses, as well as other body implant devices. For this study HNSS alloys were produced that significantly exceed previously reported results. The high nitrogen solubility was achieved using alloy chemistry modifications and atmospheric nitrogen pressures. Strength, hardness, and corrosion properties are presented that support the opportunities HNSS materials offer as biocompatible materials.
Proceedings Title
9th Cimtec-World Forum of New Materials Symposium XI - Materials in Clinical Applications
Conference Dates
May 1, 1999
Conference Location
IT
Conference Title
Symposium on Materials in Clinical Applications

Keywords

atomization, biocompatible, hardness, high nitrogen steel, HIP, implant material, prostheses, strength

Citation

Biancaniello, F. , Jiggetts, R. , Ricker, R. and Ridder, S. (1999), Characterization of Atomized High Nitrogen Stainless Steel as a Possible Implant Material, 9th Cimtec-World Forum of New Materials Symposium XI - Materials in Clinical Applications, IT, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=852888 (Accessed April 14, 2024)
Created May 1, 1999, Updated February 17, 2017