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Calcium Phosphate Cements: Chemistry, Properties, and Applications

Published

Author(s)

Laurence C. Chow

Abstract

This paper reviews recent studies on self-setting calcium phosphate cements (CPC). Discussions are focused on the cement setting reactions, the products formed, those properties of the cements that contribute to their clinical efficacy, and areas of future improvements that could make CPC useful in a wider range of applications. The strengths of CPC are considerably lower than ceramic calcium phosphate biomaterials and are also lower than some of the dental cements. On the other hand, the combination of self-setting capability and high biocompatibility makes CPC a unique biomaterial. Near perfect adaptation of the cement to the tissue surfaces in a defect, and a gradual resorption followed by new bone formation are some of the distinctive advantages of CPC. In its present state CPC appears to be suitable for a number of applications. Much remains to be done to further improve its properties to meet the requirements for different applications.
Proceedings Title
Mineralization in Natur5al and Synthetic Biomaterials, Symposium | | Mineralization in Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials | Materials Research Society
Conference Dates
November 29-December 1, 1999
Conference Title
Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings

Keywords

bone graft, calcium phosphate cements, hydroxyapatite, solubility pahse diagram

Citation

Chow, L. (2000), Calcium Phosphate Cements: Chemistry, Properties, and Applications, Mineralization in Natur5al and Synthetic Biomaterials, Symposium | | Mineralization in Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials | Materials Research Society (Accessed July 17, 2024)

Issues

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Created August 1, 2000, Updated February 19, 2017