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Assessment of Structural Steel From the World Trade Center Towers. Part IV: Experimental Techniques to Assess Possible Exposure

Published

Author(s)

Stephen W. Banovic, Timothy J. Foecke

Abstract

As part of the NIST World Trade Center investigation, recovered structural steel was examined to provide data on potential temperature excursions seen by the structural steel for input/validation of the fire and thermal finite element models. While numerous experimental techniques were appraised for use during this study, two proved to be practical: examination of the condition of the primer paint on the structural steel and evaluation of the steel mirocstructure. Results from these two techniques are presented. In the very limited number of recovered structural elements with known as-built locations, only three locations were identified as possibly having exposure to temperatures above 250 degrees C according to the pain mapping technique employed. Further, pre-collapse fires had no significant effect on the microstructure. This may be related to the protection afforded by intact spray-applied sire-resistant material on the components analyzed.
Citation
Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

Keywords

fire, high temperature exposure, microstructure, primer paint, structural steel, World Trade Center Towers

Citation

Banovic, S. and Foecke, T. (2006), Assessment of Structural Steel From the World Trade Center Towers. Part IV: Experimental Techniques to Assess Possible Exposure, Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention (Accessed July 19, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 2, 2006, Updated February 17, 2017