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Assessment of Particle Size Measurement Techniques and Procedures: I. Identification and Characterization of a Model Powder System

Published

Author(s)

Ajitkumar Jillavenkatesa, Vincent A. Hackley, G Y. Onoda

Abstract

Particle size distribution of a powder system has been observed to be dependent upon the instrument and technique used for analysis. Often, different instruments based upon the same fundamental principle give different results for the same powder. This study uses different techniques of particle size analysis to determine the size distribution of a commercially available monodisperse silica powder. The powder used in this study is assumed to be a model powder system due to the very spherical nature of the powder particles and the tight distribution of sizes centered around 1.0 υm diameter. The powder was first characterized using scanning electron microscopy to obtain visual images of the particle shapes and sizes. The dispersed powders were then analyzed using two different laser light scattering instruments and a gravitational sedimentation instrument. The measured size distributions were compared with those obtained using electron microscopy analysis and attempts made to identify the underlying factors causing variations in the observed size distributions.
Citation
Advances in Process Measurements for the Ceramic Industry

Keywords

laser light scattering, monodisperse silica, particle size distribution, particle size measurement, xray sedimentation

Citation

Jillavenkatesa, A. , Hackley, V. and Onoda, G. (1999), Assessment of Particle Size Measurement Techniques and Procedures: I. Identification and Characterization of a Model Powder System, Advances in Process Measurements for the Ceramic Industry (Accessed April 20, 2024)
Created December 31, 1998, Updated October 12, 2021