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Application of the Pipe Image Processing Machine to Scanning Microscopy

Published

Author(s)

Martin Herman

Abstract

PIPE is a pipelined image processing device that was designed for real-time robot vision applications. It accepts images from a video camera 60 times per second, and contains hardware for digitizing, displaying, and performing operations on these images at video rates. Each stage of the pipeline contains arithmetic and logic units, convolvers, image buffers, and look-up tables. The purpose of this paper is to introduce PIPE and some of its applications to the scanning microscopy community. Three kinds of applications are described. The first is stereo analysis, whose purpose is to automatically extract range from two cameras mounted side by side. The second application is motion analysis and tracking. This application involves detecting motion, measuring its velocity, using it to obtain three-dimensional information, and tracking it through time. The final application is inspection of two-dimensional patterns.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the SPIE Scanning Microscopy Technologies and Applications
Conference Dates
January 1, 1988
Conference Location
Los Angeles, CA
Conference Title
SPIE Scanning Microscopy Technologies and Applications

Keywords

Image Processing, Pipe

Citation

Herman, M. (1988), Application of the Pipe Image Processing Machine to Scanning Microscopy, Proceedings of the SPIE Scanning Microscopy Technologies and Applications, Los Angeles, CA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=820184 (Accessed May 24, 2024)

Issues

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Created January 29, 1988, Updated February 17, 2017