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Application of the Low-Loss Scanning Electron Microscope Image to Integrated Circuit Technology Part II - Chemically-Mechanically Planarized Samples

Published

Author(s)

O C. Wells, M Mcglashen-powell, Andras Vladar, Michael T. Postek

Abstract

Chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) is a process that gives a flat surface on a silicon wafer by removing material from above a chosen level. This flat surface must then be reviewed for scratches and other topographic defects. This inspection has been done using both the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the scanning electron microscope (SEM), each of which has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this study, the low-loss electron (LLE) method in the SEM was applied to silicon wafers at close to a right angle to the beam. The low-loss electrons show shallower topographic defects more clearly than it is possible with the secondary electron (SE) imaging method. These images were then calibrated and compared with those obtained using the AFM, showing the value of both methods. It is believed that the next step is to examine such samples at a right angle to the beam in the SEM using the magnetically filtered LLE imaging method.
Citation
Scanning
Volume
23(6)
Issue
No. 6

Keywords

backscattered electrons, detector, linewidth, low loss electrons, scanning electron microscope, secondary electrons

Citation

Wells, O. , Mcglashen-powell, M. , Vladar, A. and Postek, M. (2001), Application of the Low-Loss Scanning Electron Microscope Image to Integrated Circuit Technology Part II - Chemically-Mechanically Planarized Samples, Scanning (Accessed July 22, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 31, 2001, Updated October 12, 2021